Royal Hawaiian Mint

Original Mint Masterpieces Since 1974

Military Issues

Military Issues

Due to Hawaii’s unique island location in the Pacific Ocean and Pearl Harbor's role in World War II, the Mint was honored to issue the national commemorative for the 50th anniversary of the 1991 attack on Pearl Harbor for the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association. This was followed by a unique collection of Military Issues that included the Official commemorative for the 50th Anniversary of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team (RCT) whose motto: “Go for Broke” led the only Japanese unit in US military history to be the most decorated unit in World War II; the Battle of Midway, the most decisive naval battle in history; the Liberation of Guam; V-J Day and the End of World War II commemoratives complete the Military Issues. The deluxe packaging of the Military Issues for World War II produced a world class commemorative for a world wide event.

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  1. 1991 PEARL HARBOR 50TH ANNIVERSARY DALA IN BRONZE

    1991 PEARL HARBOR 50TH ANNIVERSARY DALA IN BRONZE

    $39.00

    The Commemorative the U.S. Government wouldn't issue December 7,1941 - No date in Hawaiian history has had such worldwide consequences as when the Japanese planes attacked Pearl Harbor on that awful Sunday morning. Over 2,000 Americans lost their lives, provoking millions to enlist in the fight against tyranny. After Pearl Harbor, America led the way to victory and has played the dominant role in world affairs ever since. The obverse of the 39mm Pearl Harbor Bronze Proof depicts U.S. sailors aboard the USS Nevada responding to the attack with the USS Arizona in the background. The reverse depicts the USS Arizona National Memorial, location of Pearl Harbor on Map of Oahu, Hawaii and the inscription: "Pearl Harbor. Keep America Alert. Day of Infamy." The 39mm proof bronze Pearl Harbor commemorative was never issued as a single item. This is a very rare item as the bronze was only issued in the three coin Gold Set. RE: MINTLINE OCTOBER 1991 Learn More
  2. 1991 PEARL HARBOR 50TH ANNIVERSARY SILVER PROOF

    1991 PEARL HARBOR 50TH ANNIVERSARY SILVER PROOF

    $55.00

    The Commemorative the U.S. Government wouldn't issue Sunday morning, December 7th, 1941: The day that will live in infamy begins serenely. Soldiers and airman at Hickam Field are at morning mess. Sailors and marines at Pearl Harbor have light duty schedules. False alerts and training exercises over the past month have frazzled nerves and sapped morale, but fluffy clouds in the azure sky and warm Pacific sea breezes invite the men to relax and refresh themselves. But the morning calm is deceptive. The fluffy clouds conceal a deadly danger that is already descending on the vulnerable fleet. Sailors watch in disbelief as the first torpedoes rip into the ships along Battleship Row and the first casualties fall. Then the training kicks in. Resistance builds and stiffens. Even men who have never fired a shot in anger, man machine guns and open fire. One of them, a Chaplin, utters one of the many memorable phrases of that fateful day, “Praise the Lord and pass the ammunition”. Two hours and twenty minutes later, it is over. The Japanese planes and their pilots return to their carriers. Ahead of them a delirious Japan waits to lavish honors on them for their incredible victory. Behind them, lie a sunken fleet and a United States at war. The attack on Pearl Harbor moved millions of Americans to enlist in the fight against tyranny. America was victorious and became more powerful than anyone could have imagined. So powerful that America was named the world’s first “Superpower” and has had a dominant role in world affairs ever since. The 1991 Official Pearl Harbor 50th Anniversary commemorative was authorized by the Pearl Harbor Survivor's Association. The obverse of the 39mm proof featured U.S. sailors aboard the USS Nevada defending Pearl Harbor against the attack with the USS Arizona in the background. The reverse depicts the USS Arizona National Memorial, location of Pearl Harbor on an outline of the Island of Oahu, Hawaii and the inscription: "Pearl Harbor. Keep America Alert. Day of Infamy." RE: MINTLINE OCTOBER 1991 Learn More
  3. 1991 PEARL HARBOR 50TH ANNIVERSARY- ERROR

    1991 PEARL HARBOR 50TH ANNIVERSARY- ERROR

    $115.00

    Shortly before the 50th Anniversary Pearl Harbor commemorative was scheduled for release, the Mint was shocked to learn the anti-aircraft gun depicted on the obverse of the first Pearl Harbor Dalas was a 50mm machine gun instead of a water-cooled 50 caliber Browning! Just imagine! Such an error was simply not acceptable, expressly on the Official Pearl Harbor commemorative honoring “The men who gave their lives so that Liberty shall live". It had to be changed. Then upon closer examination two other errors were discovered. The gunner's helmet, although issued during WWII, was not in use at the time of the Pearl Harbor attack. And the placement of the USS Nevada in relation to the USS Arizona was also too close. So, at great expense and loss of sales, the Mint's engraver quickly re-cut a new die that corrected the helmet, adjusted the location of the USS Nevada and changed the late model anti-aircraft machine gun to the Pre-WWII water-cooled 50 caliber Browning. Finally, the Mint was back in production. In January 1992, the 1,367 Pearl Harbor Errors were offered to anybody who had ordered a Pearl Harbor Dala. OIP for the Pearl Harbor Error that contained one ounce of .999 fine silver was $34. The Errors sold-out within a week. RE: MINTLINE JANUARY 1992 Learn More
  4. 1993 442ND 50TH ANNIVERSARY BRONZE MEDAL

    1993 442ND 50TH ANNIVERSARY BRONZE MEDAL

    $49.00

    In 1943, the 442 torch insignia was the light of liberty, desperately trying to illuminate a world shrouded in the darkness of war and prejudice. The men of the 442nd gave a new meaning to that symbol through their own sacrifice. They brought the true meaning of the word "American" out of the shadows of fear. The hand holding the torch, is their hand. The torch itself, is their struggle to have their people counted among their Japanese forbearers who crossed an ocean to become Americans. The light from the torch is the light they shed by their dedication to duty and Americanism is their legacy. The 50th Anniversary Commemorative of the 442nd RCT symbolizes not only those who served… it symbolizes the entire Nisei generation who sacrificed their lives, their fortunes, but not their sacred honor. They fought the war on two fronts… one on the battlefield and perjustice at home. And despite the denials and indignities, they served and fought for themselves and for all the others who were not allowed. Yet these honored warriors never sought to prove that they were better, only equal. In demonstrating their equality, they defined what it is to be an American and set a higher standard of duty and honor for the future generations of all Americans. The 442nd motto was “Go for Broke.” They did that and became a real American legend. The single bronze commemorative was only available as part of the Silver/Bronze set. RE: MINTLINE MARCH 1993. FIRST TIME SOLD AS A SINGLE COIN Learn More
  5. 1993 442ND 50TH ANNIVERSARY SILVER PROOF

    1993 442ND 50TH ANNIVERSARY SILVER PROOF

    $89.00

    In 1943, the 442 torch insignia was the light of liberty, desperately trying to illuminate a world shrouded in the darkness of war and prejudice. The men of the 442nd gave a new meaning to that symbol through their own sacrifice. They brought the true meaning of the word "American" out of the shadows of fear. The hand holding the torch, is their hand. The torch itself, is their struggle to have their people counted among their Japanese forbearers who crossed an ocean to become Americans. The light from the torch is the light they shed by their dedication to duty and Americanism is their legacy. The 50th Anniversary Commemorative of the 442nd RCT symbolizes not only those who served… it symbolizes the entire Nisei generation who sacrificed their lives, their fortunes, but not their sacred honor. They fought the war on two fronts… one on the battlefield and prejudice at home. And despite the denials and indignities, they served and fought for themselves and for all the others who were not allowed. Yet these honored warriors never sought to prove that they were better, only equal. In demonstrating their equality, they defined what it is to be an American and set a higher standard of duty and honor for the future generations of all Americans. The 442nd motto was “Go for Broke.” They did that and became a real American legend. The single bronze commemorative was not available when initially issued. RE: MINTLINE MARCH 1993 Learn More
  6. 1994 LIBERATION OF GUAM IN BRONZE

    1994 LIBERATION OF GUAM IN BRONZE

    $39.00

    Royal Hawaiian Mint in association with The Guahan Mint announced the 50th Anniversary of the Liberation of Guam that ended the only Japanese occupation of an American Territory captured during WWII. Looking out over this beautiful, peaceful island, it is hard to imagine that modern Guam, which caters to mostly Japanese visitors, saw some of the fiercest battles of World War II. Against this backdrop of contrasting images an official issue of three outstanding coins was authorized by the National Association for Uniformed Services (NAUS) in commemoration of the Liberation of Guam. The obverse of depicts the four invasion forces; Army, Navy, Marines and the Guam Combat Patrol. The reverse contains the official NAUS motto, US and Guam flags and legend "A Grateful Chamorro Remembers." on the 39mm bronze commemorative coin. Only sold as part of the three coin Gold Set. RE: MINTLINE OCTOBER 1994 Learn More
  7. 1995 V-JAY DAY 50TH ANNIVERSARY SILVER PROOF

    1995 V-JAY DAY 50TH ANNIVERSARY SILVER PROOF

    $89.00

    World War II began for Americans at Pearl Harbor, with Japan's devastating attack. It ended in Japan, after atomic bombs destroyed two cities. Unconditional surrender — absolute victory. On V-J Day, the airwaves boomed out a single message that would save millions of lives, "Cease fire ... CEASE FIRE ... the war is over." And headlines across America blazoned, "VICTORY!" V-J Day triggered a massive celebration unlike any before, or since — a tremendous outpouring of joy that will never be forgotten. On September 2, 1945, Japan's unconditional surrender was signed the quarterdeck of the USS Missouri, anchored in Tokyo Bay. General Douglas MacArthur, Supreme Allied Commander of the Pacific Theatre, voiced the official end of World War II 'to a worldwide radio audience. He then uttered the hope for lasting peace — that another such war would never be fought. "The utter destructiveness of war now blots out this alternative". The Royal Hawaiian Mint was honored to be authorized by the State of Hawaii to mint the official commemoratives for the end of World War II. Each silver coin contained one full ounce of .999 fine silver - exceeding the U.S. Mint specifications of their WWII commemoratives that had three quarters of an ounce of fine silver. OIP for the ounce 999 fine silver V-J Dala was $35.00. RE: MINTLINE AUGUST 1995 Learn More
  8. 1998 USS MISSOURI SILVER PROOF

    1998 USS MISSOURI SILVER PROOF

    $55.00

    If you were ever in the military service, when you hear the name, “USS Missouri,” a single image flashes into mind, of General Mac Arthur directing the Japanese delegation to sign the Formal Instrument of Surrender on September 2nd, 1945. For this moment alone, she will forever have a place in the hearts and history of the American people. Launched at the Brooklyn Navy Yard on January 29th, 1944, the USS Missouri was the last battleship ever built by the United States. She saw service at Iwo Jima and Okinawa in World War II and again during the Korean Conflict before being decommissioned in 1955. Recommissioned in 1986, she participated in several naval exercises in the Pacific, but her guns were never fired again in anger. In 1997, the USS Missouri was again decommissioned and began her journey to her final port of call... Pearl Harbor. Now this honored old battleship sits high in the water at a slot on Pearl Harbor's famed "Battleship Row"... next to another famous battleship, the remains of the USS Arizona. The OIP for the 39mm one ounce .999 fine silver Proof was $25 RE: MINTLINE OCTOBER 1998 Learn More
  9. 2011 PEARL HARBOR 70TH ANNIVERSARY BRONZE POOF

    2011 PEARL HARBOR 70TH ANNIVERSARY BRONZE POOF

    $24.00

    DECEMBER 7, 1941: "A date which will live in infamy.” No event in Hawaii has had such worldwide impact as the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor that forced America into a war that ultimately lead to victory and a dominant role in world affairs. Sunday morning, December 7th, 1941. The day begins serenely. Soldiers and airman at Hickam Field are at morning mess. Sailors and marines at Pearl Harbor have light duty schedules. False alerts and training exercises over the past month have frazzled nerves and sapped morale, but fleecy clouds in the azure sky and warm Pacific sea breezes invites the men to relax and refresh themselves. But the morning calm is deceptive. The fluffy clouds conceal a deadly danger that is already descending on the vulnerable fleet. Sailors watch in disbelief as the first torpedoes rip into the ships along Battleship Row and the first casualties fall. Then the training kicks in. Resistance builds and stiffens. Even men who have never fired a shot in anger, man machine guns and open fire. One of them, a Chaplin, utters one of the many memorable phrases of that fateful day, “Praise the Lord and pass the ammunition”. Two hours and twenty minutes later, it is over. The Japanese planes and their pilots return to their carriers. Ahead of them a delirious Japan waits to lavish honors on them for their incredible victory. Behind them, lie a sunken fleet and a United States at war. The attack on Pearl Harbor moved millions of Americans to enlist in the fight against tyranny. America was victorious and became more powerful than anyone could have imagined. So powerful that America was named the world’s first “Superpower.” Learn More
  10. 2011 PEARL HARBOR 70TH ANNIVERSARY SILVER & BRONZE SET

    2011 PEARL HARBOR 70TH ANNIVERSARY SILVER & BRONZE SET

    $99.00

    DECEMBER 7, 1941: "A date which will live in infamy.” No event in Hawaii has had such worldwide impact as the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor that forced America into a war that ultimately lead to victory and a dominant role in world affairs. Sunday morning, December 7th, 1941. The day begins serenely. Soldiers and airman at Hickam Field are at morning mess. Sailors and marines at Pearl Harbor have light duty schedules. False alerts and training exercises over the past month have frazzled nerves and sapped morale, but fleecy clouds in the azure sky and warm Pacific sea breezes invites the men to relax and refresh themselves. But the morning calm is deceptive. The fluffy clouds conceal a deadly danger that is already descending on the vulnerable fleet. Sailors watch in disbelief as the first torpedoes rip into the ships along Battleship Row and the first casualties fall. Then the training kicks in. Resistance builds and stiffens. Even men who have never fired a shot in anger, man machine guns and open fire. One of them, a Chaplin, utters one of the many memorable phrases of that fateful day, “Praise the Lord and pass the ammunition”. Two hours and twenty minutes later, it is over. The Japanese planes and their pilots return to their carriers. Ahead of them a delirious Japan waits to lavish honors on them for their incredible victory. Behind them, lie a sunken fleet and a United States at war. The attack on Pearl Harbor moved millions of Americans to enlist in the fight against tyranny. America was victorious and became more powerful than anyone could have imagined. So powerful that America was named the world’s first “Superpower.” Learn More

Items 1 to 10 of 11 total

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Page:
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  2. 2

Grid  List 

Set Descending Direction